Tagged: Employee

Independent Contractor No More? (and why that matters to musicians)

There is a key distinction in the law that differentiates between an employee and an independent contractor.  Employees are entitled to certain benefits and protections that contractors are not; chief amongst them, wage protection (minimum wage requirements and overtime benefits etc.), health insurance and paid time off.   Contractors, on the other hand, are viewed as hired guns that can be paid lump sums, do not qualify for overtime and are not eligible for insurance coverage offered to employees.  The music industry is dominated by contractor relationships.  Think of studio musicians, managers, dancers, producers, writers, roadies, back up singers etc.  All of which, until recently, fell squarely in the independent contractor category.

California, the largest hub for the entertainment industry in the world, took a different take on the employee versus contractor feud.  In recent legislation signed by Governor Newsom, CA AB5, Californians will be considered employees unless and until their employer can show that the work that they perform falls under a specific set of criteria.  Specifically, a worker is an employee under AB5 if his or her job forms part of a company’s core business, if the bosses direct the way the work is done or if the worker has not established an independent trade or business.

While the law was a direct result of the so-called “app” industry (e.g. Uber, Lyft, Postmates etc.), the repercussions could clearly spread across other industries.  So what does this mean for musicians and the industry as a whole in California?

As written, AB5 would arguably classify a recording artist as an employer and her manager, tour manager, guest artists, choreographer etc. would all be her employees.  This would require the artist to set up a payroll system, withhold taxes, set hourly wages, pay for overtime, potentially offer insurance and everything else that a normal company would provide to an employee.  Anyone in this industry knows that this shift would be a monumental change and frankly, is just not practical.

Unlike other industries, music industry organizations (RIAA, A2IM and others) lobbied to ban the legislation altogether rather than seek an exemption.  Doctors, accountants, travel agents, real estate agents, cosmetologists and other sought and achieved carve outs so as to not fall under the new qualifications of AB5.  Alleged in-fighting amongst music industry leaders resulted in full inclusion under the law rather than a potentially helpful exemption.

The fear that AB5 will gut the entertainment industry in California is real.  Other states are already looking to capitalize by attempting to lure “contractors” to within their borders.  Still other states are looking to model their own laws after the California law and touting their own version of employee protection.

The law does not go into effect until January 1, 2010.  Until then there will most likely be litigation that may delay its start date.  We will continue to monitor the situation and provide updates.