Tagged: skrillex

Is EDM Music? Answer: Who Cares!?!

As you know, typically we write about protecting your rights.  This post is about musicians, of all types, having the right to make music in any format he or she may want.  

Every decade or so a new type of music becomes popular amongst the teen to twenty-somethings.  With the onset of a “new” hot genre of music an inevitable reaction is harsh criticism.   The thirty-plus-somethings who still are fond of the trend that was tops when they were of a “taste-making” age cannot help themselves and shred the quality, craftsmanship or artistry of the the music trend du jour.

I guess it is a right of passage; you get to a certain age and you automatically are permitted to present your opinons on why whatever is hot right now sucks compared to what you like.  In my formative years, rap took shape and took over.  When I started rolling around in my Chevy Citation with a sideways tape deck and front-only speakers blasting Poor Righteous Teachers, De la Soul and NWA (when I was feeling especially hard) I definitely got some nasty looks from inhabitants of my white-bread suburb of Minneapolis.  I immediately dismissed my parents and other elders who disclaimed that Rap was nothing more than unoriginal shouting and noise.  They (Parents) just didn’t understand (thank you Will Smith).

Every generation has a similar story.  Elvis and Chuck Berry were nothing but trouble makers with all that electronic nonsense and rotating hips.  The Grateful Dead, Jefferson Airplane and the Almond Brothers were pot smoking hippies who made noise that was only audible to people on acid trips.  Ramones, Sex Pistols and the Misfits were screamers who couldn’t play more than one chord on a guitar.  Hair bands came about, and well…I don’t know what to say about hair bands.  The point is, every generation has its own thing, its own view point on music and society.  That point begets the counter point that the preceding generations typically hate the succeeding generations music and viewpoints.

Enter Electronic Dance Music.  EDM has taken the world by storm.  DJs who seemingly have no traditional musical ability or knowledge are selling out tours and arenas with their version of music.  Is it melodic or overly complicated in production and writing?  No.  Will it stand the test of time?  Maybe.  Is it actually music at all?  Who cares?

Kids love it and are paying to see it.  Yet, the music industry cannot help but get in the way of itself.  Complaints by critics and label execs complain that it is destroying the professional musician and his/her chance at a career.  Stories of musicians making less money because of the large number of computer programmers currently “acting” as imposter musicians are all over the industry blogs and postings.  Complaints of so-called talentless button pushers are rampant amongst the “purists”.

What we can’t seem to understand is why are all of these critics complaining about anyone in the music industry making money?  Jealousy is the obvious answer.  Laziness or stubbornness are additional answers.  The point is, in an industry that has completely changed in the past 15 plus years, another change in popular genres or fan patters should not be surprising.  EDM is just another example of a new generation making a choice of what it wants to party and dance to; nothing more.  No one is saying you should listen to it and no one is forcing you to buy a dub-step or die t-shirt.  Just don’t hate on the kids that do.

EDM has had a huge impact on recent sales from pure DJ’s like Skrillex and Bassnectar to the EDM producers like Guetta and Afrojack.  The Pop world has embraced it with acts like Bieber, Usher, Britney and Madonna jumping on the bandwagon and incorporating Dubstep and EDM styles into their major label releases.  New festivals and concert series are popping up all over the place and bringing in huge revenue for the promoters, vendors and, oh yeah, the musicians.

So whether you can get down to “wub wub wub” or it makes you stroke out, try to accept it as the natural evolution of music.  If you make EDM music, do what you can to learn the ins and outs of the music industry.  If you are good, no doubt the late to the party label folks are coming around.  Know what you are getting into before you get into it.  Your music, whether created on a piano or a keyboard, carries the same rights as any other music.  Make sure you protect it and make sure you cash in before the next craze takes shape.

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What Can Musicians Be Thankful For In 2011?

This Dancing Turkey is Definitely Thankful to Be Alive.

Perusing the local trade magazines or attending a music based conference can lead a musician (or someone who works with musicians) to believe that Armageddon is truly here.  If we hear one more speech or read one more article about the end of the music industry as we know it, we will certainly collectively go nutso. 

The truth is the entire economy is in the crapper.  We don’t know one industry that hasn’t been touched (well, maybe crime, if that is an industry).  Music has certainly not been immune.  However, we here at L4M are here to say that Debbie Downer needs to turn her frown upside down.  While the days of multi-multi platinum records and huge advances are certainly on death’s doorstep, the savvy musician can do more than just eek out a living.  Here are some things we think musicians should be happy about:

1.  The Internet.  Long hailed as the assassin of the music industry, the world-wide web offers more opportunities than it does problems if you know how to ride the waves.  Not only has the internet introduced the fan to new (and mostly legitimate) ways of finding new music, collaborative websites now allow musicians a means to create, promote and distribute their music.  Sites like TopSpin, BeatPort, BandCentral, SoundCloud and Facebook have become essential and typically inexpensive methods for sharing talent, ideas and product.  If utilized properly, the internet’s social media platforms can completely replace a label based pr system.  Access, affordability and a global reach are definitely something that the Internet provides to the musician willing to navigate it.

2.  Music Festivals.  Music festivals breath new life and huge opportunities to major label talent as well as emerging bands.  Bringing great music to enormous crowds coupled with innovative festival organizers oftentimes bring great results.  Not only are festivals bringing tremendous revenues to musicians and the organizers, they offer great opportunities to buzz bands to play in front of huge crowds and important taste makers.  On top of that, every festival brings with it industry parties, opening slots for after shows, and tons of press.  Emerging bands who strategically plan ahead for a visiting festival can really cash in (maybe not as much as Perry Farrell, but still…).

3.  Music Licensing.  It used to be that in order to get your music licensed your label or publisher would have to cozy up to a music supervisor.  With the amount of media content around the world growing at a record pace (think tv, radio, satellite radio, internet programming, commercials, film etc.) there is a matching need for quality music.  Jingles are a thing of the past.  Ad agencies with unlimited budgets for music is also rare at best.  Quality music that may originate from lesser known musicians but do not carry with it the rigors of publisher and label demands has become imperative.  Musicians who work to get their music to savvy music libraries can make money on both up front music licensing sync fees as well as the oftentimes lucrative performance royalties. 

4. The Remix.  Want to resurrect an old single?  Want to make some money as a producer by resurrecting that old singer?  Never before has the remix been more important.  DJ’s like Skrillex and Guetta have become über rich by making a name for themselves as talented remixers as well as great djs.  For popular musicians, remixes by producers or other bands can lead to revitalized sales of a falling single.  The remix is a handy promotional tool as well (Lady Gaga will be ever-present again for a while as she announces the release of an entire remix album).  Another means of collaboration, oftentimes between artists who would not otherwise work together is definitely a trend that we can all be thankful for in 2011. 

5.  Vinyl.  The LP appears to be back for good.  Collectors as well as a  new generation of music purchasers appear to be favoring holding something cool in their hands and not just in an electronic file living in an Ipod.  While still expensive to manufacture, vinyl sales in 2011 continue to defy the rest of the industry.  A positive trend that began several years ago, there does not seem to be a slow down to the sale of the old school vinyl record. 

What about you?  What are you thankful for as a musician or a music fan in 2011?  Please comment below.  Let’s stay positive and bring in the joy during this holiday season.  Having trouble doing so, slap on the collector’s edition of Justin Bieber’s Christmas album.  We have no doubt that you will soon be smiling!